“Something Greater Than Solomon Is Here.”

Solomon is one of the more intriguing people to study in the Bible. He was born to King David through Bathsheba. Since he was a man of peace, once he became king, God would use him to build His temple (1 Chronicles 22:8-10). He was a very wise man. In fact, Solomon’s wisdom was so great that people from all over the world would come and ask him difficult questions (1 Kings 10). A great example of his wise judgment is found in 1 Kings 3:16-28.

Solomon was also an extremely wealthy man (2 Chronicles 1:17). He had much gold, silver, and many palaces, and chariots. He also had 700 wives and 300 concubines. Unfortunately, it would many of his wives who would lead him away from God (1 Kings 11:3-6).

Solomon is said to have told over 3,000 proverbs. A proverb is a wise saying or precept. Many of them are found in the book of Proverbs. Proverbs is a great book with much practical wisdom that can help people of any generation. It contains wisdom about parenting (13:24; 19:18), avoiding debt (22:7), how to pick good friends (17:17), the dangers of alcohol (23:29-35), and host of other things. When reading Proverbs, it is always important to remember that the source of Solomon’s great wisdom was God.  Like all of the other great Bible writers, the things written by Solomon in the Proverbs were written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit (2 Timothy 3:16-17).

While Solomon was indeed a great man who did much good in the cause of God, it is important to note that “something greater than Solomon is here.” These words were spoken by Jesus in Matthew 12:42 to the scribes and Pharisees while rebuking them for rejecting His wonderful work. With this statement, Jesus is expressing frustration because the Queen of the South traveled a great distance to hear Solomon’s great wisdom, but they had the Messiah right there in front of them and they constantly rejected Him. The Queen of the South knew there was something special about Solomon. Many of the scribes and Pharisees intentionally failed to see that in Jesus.

What makes Jesus “greater than Solomon?”

  • Solomon was wise, but Jesus is the source from which all wisdom flows. He was the full embodiment of God’s word (John 1:1). He contained perfect knowledge of the will of God because He came from God.
  • Solomon was a man of peace, but Jesus is the “Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6). He is the source of peace between God and men (Romans 5:10). He is the King over a spiritual kingdom that doesn’t fight with guns and swords, but with the “the gospel of peace” (Ephesians 6:15).
  • Solomon was led away from God through his many wives, but Jesus always remained true and faithful to God. He was perfectly holy and sinless (1 Peter 2:21-22). He was determined to do the will of God no matter what obstacles came His way (Matthew 4:1-11; 26:39).

Unfortunately, many of the religious leaders in the first century failed to see the contrasts that existed between Jesus and Solomon. What about you? Do you see them? If so, will you allow them to change your life?

It would be a shame if we read and applied the teaching of Proverbs but rejected the words of the gospel because with Jesus, “something greater than Solomon is here.”

– Shawn Jeffries

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Wisdom: A Good Thing to Ask For

If God came to you today and said, “Ask me anything you want and I will give it to you.” What would you ask for? What would be the one thing you wanted above all else? Would it be to be healed of a sickness? Would it be 20 million dollars in your bank account? Would you ask to be taller or shorter? Would you ask for world peace and the end of terrorism?

Interestingly, there is a man in the Bible who found himself in this situation. At the beginning of his reign as the king of Israel, God appeared to Solomon in a dream. God said to him, “Ask what you wish Me to give you” (1 Kings 3:5).  Amazingly, Solomon did not ask for fame, riches, and a long reign as king. Instead he asked for wisdom! He asked for good judgment in order that he would lead God’s people fairly and righteously (1 Kings 3:6-9).

What an interesting request for Solomon to make. And yet, God was very pleased with it. In fact, God was so impressed with it that He not only gave Solomon wisdom like no one before or after him, but also promised to give him riches, honor, and a long life to reign as king if he followed the Lord with all his heart (1 Kings 3:10-15).

How often do you find yourself asking God for wisdom? Throughout the Bible we learn that wisdom is valuable and God is pleased when His children ask for it.

  • “But if any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, who gives to all generously and without reproach, and it will be given him.” (James 1:5)
  • “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and instruction.” (Proverbs 1:7)
  • “How blessed is the man who finds wisdom and the man who gains understanding.” (Proverbs 3:13)
  • “Acquire wisdom! Acquire understanding! Do not forget her, and she will guard you; love her, and she will guard you.” (Proverbs 4:5-6)
  • “She (a reference to wisdom) is more precious than jewels; and nothing you desire compares with her.” (Proverbs 3:15)

Here is the challenge for the week: At least once a day spend some time talking with God about wisdom. Make at least one prayer each day asking God for wisdom and explain why you want it. Remember Solomon told God why he wanted wisdom (1 Kings 3:9). Don’t be afraid to tell God you want wisdom so you can be a better spouse, or parent, or student of the Bible, or worker on your job. Don’t shy away from asking for wisdom so you can be more conscious of the devil’s work and avoid the pitfalls he puts before you in life.

With all the things you will pray for this week, don’t forget about wisdom! God promises to give wisdom to you generously if you see the value of asking Him in prayer for it.

– Shawn Jeffries

Facing Death with Terra Cotta Warriors

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I’ll never forget taking my kids to the Indianapolis Children’s Museum. As we toured their exhibit, China’s Terra Cotta Warriors: The Emperor’s Painted Army, I came face to face with a twenty-five-hundred-year-old Chinese General. As I learned about these full-scale sculptures, it brought to mind the Scripture:

“For we brought nothing into this world and it is certain we can carry nothing out,” 1 Timothy 6:7.

But China’s first emperor, Qin Shi Huangdi (260-210 BC), could not have disagreed more. He invested an estimated 70,000 craftsman over three to four decades constructing an elaborate underground city for his burial, complete with a population made of clay. Until relatively recently, tales of Qin Shi Huangdi’s necropolis were a favorite Chinese legend.

In 1974, rural farmers accidently discovered the emperor’s ancient burial complex while digging a water well. As archaeologists began investigating the area in the Shaanxi Province, they unearthed an army of elaborate, life-sized, terra cotta sculptures. 1,000 of an estimated 8,000 terra cotta warriors have been excavated. There is believed to be 130 full scale chariots and 670 horses as well. Qin Shi Haungdi’s terra cotta army includes Generals, Infantrymen, Archers, and Cavalrymen, as well as Acrobats, Musicians, and Birds. Each sculpture held an actual tool or weapon and thus far, no two faces are alike.

This emperor approached death as he did life – he intended to reign. Qin Shi Huangdi managed to conquer all of China’s warring regions and consolidate an empire. He was a violent man and paranoid about his rule. While his tomb has not been opened, excavations and histories demonstrate that he killed sons suspected of treachery, his wives were buried alive with his body, and all of the workers and craftsman involved in constructing the necropolis were executed to prevent grave robbery. Like the Pharaoh’s of old, this Chinese ruler believed he would need a palace, provisions, riches, and even an army to serve him in the afterlife.

Today the terra cotta warriors stand at attention; a silent witness of one man’s plan to face death. While his materialistic approach demonstrates he was wholly unequipped for the spiritual realities of death, no one can accuse him of taking his death lightly.  Over 30 years he contemplated and prepared for what should happen after he died.

It is good to ponder death (Ecclesiastes 7:2-4). King Solomon of ancient Israel (reigned ca. 970-930 BC) also considered death. With wisdom from God he wrote, “No one has power over the spirit to retain the spirit, And no one has power in the day of death. There is no release from that war, And wickedness will not deliver those who are given to it” (Ecclesiastes 8:8).

Indeed, death is the great equalizer – rich or poor, king or peasant, wise or fool – the time comes to die. “And how dies a wise man die? As the fool!” (Ecclesiastes 2:16; see also Ecclesiastes 3:2).

Furthermore, in Psalm 89:47-48, Ethan’s contemplation is found, “Remember how short my time is; For what futility have you created all the children of men? What man can live and not see death? Can he deliver his life from the power of the grave?”

How many of our neighbors in American society truly ponder death for even 30 minutes a year, let alone a 30 year public works building project of terra cotta? Like other ancient rulers, Qin Shi Huangdi saw himself as the Master and the Potter. But Scripture teaches us that the truth of the matter is people are the clay, not the potter. We do not need to craft things to serve us in death but allow God to mold us in life that we might serve Him today and glorify Him through death (Romans 14:8).

“But now, O Lord, You are our Father; We are the clay, and You our potter; And all we are the work of Your hand,” Isaiah 64:8.

By Andrew Roberts