Lessons from the Prayer Life of Jesus

Are you married? Imagine for a moment what your marriage would be like if you and your spouse hardly ever talked to one another. What if the only conversation you had with your spouse involved just a few words that might be spoken over a meal or before you went to sleep?  What if your few words of conversation involved the same old dialogue (ex: “Thanks for dinner.” “Have you taken out the trash?” “What is on TV tonight?”)? What if these same old conversations never lasted for more than a minute or two?  What if days went by without either of you taking the time to speak to one another?

There is no way we would be able to tolerate this kind of communication (or lack thereof).  But if we would not accept this in our marriage, why would we accept it in our relationship with God?  Our relationship with God is supposed to be our most important relationship. Two thousand years ago God sent His Son Jesus to this earth to die on the cross. Through Jesus’ death, the penalty for sin was paid and those who come to God can pray freely to Him and trust He will both listen and respond (Romans 5:8-10; 1 Peter 3:12; Philippians 4:6-7; 1 Thessalonians 5:17). Prayer is an amazing privilege for the people of God. And yet, unfortunately so often it is neglected!

This is a problem with SIGNIFICANT spiritual consequences. A neglected prayer life leaves us     disconnected and separated from God. How do we fix this problem? Perhaps the best approach is to study the prayer life of Jesus.

  • Jesus prayed frequently. When we search the gospels we find numerous references to Jesus communicating with His Father. After miraculously feeding the five thousand, He prayed (Matthew 14:22-23). Early in the morning as He began His day, He prayed (Mark 1:35). As the news about His power began to spread throughout the world, He would often slip into the wilderness and pray (Luke 5:15-16). Before being transfigured on the mountain, He prayed (Luke 9:28-29). Before being arrested in the Garden, He prayed (Luke 22:39-44). Jesus teaches us that frequent prayer is absolutely necessary to nurture our relationship with God. It is an opportunity to pour out our hearts and share with God our inner most feelings (1 Peter 5:6-7). Next time we are wrestling with a big decision, problem, or have some good news to share let’s make it our first instinct to talk to God about the matter.
  • Jesus made prayer happen. Jesus had a pressing schedule. He traveled many places teaching God’s word. He frequently debated and confronted His enemies. He trained His disciples. He constantly performed miracles to confirm His identity. It was not easy for Jesus to find the time and solitude necessary for prayer. But He always did it (Mark 1:35; Luke 6:12)! No doubt we also have very busy schedules. But like Jesus we need to make prayer happen. We need to turn off the television and the phone. We need to put down the tablet. We need to work out a time for our spouse to watch our young children for a few minutes. We need to tell our older kids we are praying and not to disturb us for a while. Like Jesus, we need to also find a place of solitude for prayer (bedroom, quiet place in the backyard, go for a walk in the park, etc). Doing these things will take our prayer lives to the next level!
  • Jesus prayed with variety. His prayers were not always the same. Sometimes they were lengthy and deep (Luke 6:12). Other times they were brief and addressed to one specific, immediate need (Luke 23:34). Like Jesus, our prayers also need to have variety. Sometimes our prayers can be short and specific (ex: praying for someone giving you a hard time on your job; praying to overcome a tempting situation you may be in; praying over your meal). Other times our prayers can be lengthy and focused (ex: your prayer when you wake up in the morning, or before you go to bed).

God gives us the privilege of prayer because He wants to be our friend. However, He does not force this relationship on us. We must decide that we want the friendship He offers. From Jesus we learn that how we prioritize prayer plays a huge factor in the decisions we make.

– Shawn Jeffries

An Extra Day

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Leap Day! Leap Year! An extra day! What would you do with an extra day?

Joshua’s prayer for an extra day is an amazing Bible account.

The prayer was a dynamic mixture of God’s determined will and mankind’s bold request. The result was a miracle.

“Then Joshua spoke to the Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites before the children of Israel, and he said in the sight of Israel: ‘Sun, stand still over Gibeon; and Moon, the Valley of Aijalon.’ So the sun stood still, and the moon stopped, till the people had revenge upon their enemies…So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and did not hasten to go down for about a whole day. And there has been no day like that, before it or after it, that the Lord heeded the voice of a man; for the Lord fought for Israel,” Joshua 10:12-14.

The Lord fought for Israel and protected her against her enemies, the Amorites. The Lord was with Joshua and the troops, He even rained hail down on the enemies (Joshua 10:11). The hail killed more Amorites than the sword!

That day was special. There has been no day like it. But what was more special than the sun stilled was the prayer prayed! There has never been another day where the Lord heeded the voice of a man like that.

Joshua wanted more time, an extra day, to fulfill the Lord’s determined will. The Lord fought for Israel and Joshua fought for the Lord. It’s exciting to see that when the Lord reveals His will, and His people are eager to obey, the only thing yet required is the time to do it. And God supplies the time!

For New Testament Christians, the apostles teach us to consider each day as time God has given to serve Him. Time is a valuable and limited resource. “See then that you walk circumspectly, not as fools but as wise, redeeming the time, because the days are evil. Therefore do not be unwise, but understand what the will of the Lord is,” Ephesians 5:15-17.

It’s safe to say that Joshua understood what the will of the Lord was in his day (Joshua 10:8).

So, it’s not beyond Christians to understand what the will of the Lord is either. The Scriptures teach us (2 Timothy 3:16-17). What remains for us to attain is an attitude of faith like Joshua. An attitude that says, “I will spend today serving God. I will not procrastinate but I will ask God to give me all the time necessary to accomplish His will. And if I get another day – even an extra day – I will use it in the same way: for the glory of God.”

Make the most of your leap day, make the most of every day!

By Andrew Roberts

A Good Day To Pray For The President

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An election year often produces more buzz over the next President than concern over the current President. Yet, the office of President produces the potential to make landmark, life altering, decisions every day. They don’t get weekends off and the buck stops with them. For instance, with the passing of Justice Scalia, President Obama’s appointment to the Supreme Court will impact the nation for years to come.

This is a good day to pray for the President. But it is always a good day to pray for the President.

Whoever the President, whatever his party, however long he holds the office; it is the duty of saints to pray for him. Indeed, 2 Timothy 2:1-4 encourages saints to pray broadly for leaders and kings among men. Let’s remember that our brotherhood, Christ’s kingdom, crosses all national boundaries because the Lord Jesus rules in the hearts of men. In other words, there are Christians praying for their rulers in Democracies, Dictatorships, Monarchies, Communist States, and even Islamic States – all at the same time.

Whatever could all Christians ask that all national leaders could influence? Again, 2 Timothy 2:1-4 offers the answer:

  • Peace – “that we may all lead a quiet and peaceable life…”
  • Godliness – “…in all godliness…”
  • Dignity – “…and reverence…”
  • Salvation – “who desires all men to be saved…”
  • Proclamation of the gospel – “…and to come to the knowledge of the truth.”

George Washington set a positive precedent by encouraging people to pray.

“It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favors.” – George Washington, 1st President of the United States of America

Abraham Lincoln confessed that his work was too taxing not to pray for himself.

“I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had no where else to go. My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for that day.” – Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States of America

National calls for prayer still come from our leaders, but often in the aftermath of some sort of tragedy. That’s not a criticism but an observation. Where else can we turn in dark hours? Yet, I can’t help but wonder, if our leaders entreated our prayers daily and we responded with daily prayer for them (and our neighbors) if some tragedies couldn’t be avoided altogether?

Today let’s not limit our prayers to thanksgivings for Washington and Lincoln. Let’s make supplications and intercessions for the President of the hour and the leaders of the world. The Bible teaches us what to say. And let’s remember to pray for them all again, tomorrow.

By Andrew Roberts